Clinton Wins Big in Arizona; Sanders Asked to End Campaign

image1Hillary Clinton, the Democratic front-runner, won the Arizona primary by a huge margin over her opponent and continues to rack up pledged delegates.

With 94% reporting at the time of this writing, the Arizona win gives Clinton another 41 pledged delegates, expanding her lead to 1214. Sen. Bernie Sanders

Bernard Sanders continues his campaign despite a nearly insurmountable gap in delegates. Clinton leads his 901 delegates by 313 and her superdelegate count is 467 to his 26.

Final results from the Western Primary are still coming in but show Sanders gaining 18 delegates in Utah, 17 in Idaho and 22 in Arizona for a net win of 57. Clinton lost in two of the three states yet gained 51 delegates.

Meanwhile, the founder and publisher of Daily Kos, a staunch online support base for Sanders, pronounced his campaign over in a March 22 op-ed for The Hill, another political commentary site.

In his piece, Markos Moulitsas reasoned that Sanders has no reasonable chance of overcoming the delegate numbers to gain the nomination.

“…there is no plausible route for Sanders to overcome the advantage Clinton enjoyed of 319 pledged delegates before Tuesday’s contests. Since the former first lady leads the pledged delegate race 58 percent to 42 percent, with roughly half of the delegates to take the nomination already allocated, Sanders would have to win nearly 60 percent of delegates in the remaining states just to tie her.

That’s just not going to happen.” – Markos Moulitsas

Jann S. Wenner, editor and publisher of Rolling Stone magazine, originally planned to publish his endorsement of Hillary Clinton this weekend. However, the endorsement is now up at the Rolling Stone web portal. A simple headline (“Hillary Clinton for President“) and a large image of Clinton by Roberto Parada punctuates the full-page editorial.

Wenner describes her as a “tough, thoroughly tested fighter” and calls Clinton’s nomination a “clear and urgent choice” for Democrats. The alternative magazine depicts the Sanders campaign as a failed revolution, and criticizes the Senator from Vermont for the absence of any viable plan.

“…anger is not a plan; it is not a reason to wield power; it is not a reason for hope. I have been to the revolution before. It ain’t happening.

It’s easy to blame billionaires for everything, but quite another to know what to do about it.”Jann S. Wenner

The Sanders campaign contends that it will continue the race through the June primaries and the Convention with the hope of persuading Democratic superdelegates to flip for the Independent Senator.

Advertisements